Biosafety Levels

Biological agents, plant or animal, are classified according to biosafety level risk groups. These classifications presume ordinary circumstances in the research laboratory, or growth of agents in small volumes for diagnostic and experimental purposes.

BSL-1 risk group contains biological agents that pose low risk to personnel and the environment. These agents are highly unlikely to cause disease in healthy laboratory workers, animals or plants. The agents require Biosafety Level 1 containment. Examples of BSL-1 organisms are: Agrobacterium radiobacter, Aspergillus niger, Bacillus thuringiensis, Escherichia coli strain K12, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Micrococcus leuteus, Neurospora crassa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Serratia marcescens.

BSL-2 risk group contains biological agents that pose moderate risk to personnel and the environment. If exposure occurs in a laboratory situation, the risk of spread is limited and it rarely would cause infection that would lead to serious disease. Effective treatment and preventive measures are available in the event that an infection occurs. The agents require Biosafety Level 2 containment. Examples of BSL-2 organisms are: Mycobacterium, Streptococcus pneumonia, Salmonella choleraesuis.

BSL-3 risk group contains biological agents that usually cause serious disease (human, animal or plant) or that can result in serious economic consequences. These agents are usually not spread by casual contact. The agents require Biosafety Level 3 containment. PROHIBITED

BSL-4 risk group contains biological agents that usually produce very serious disease (human, animal or plant) that is often untreatable. These agents are usually easily transmitted from one individual to another, from animal to human or vice-versa, either directly or indirectly, or by casual contact. The agents require Biosafety Level 4 containment. PROHIBITED

Levels of Biological Containment

There are four levels of biological containment (Biosafety Level 1 - 4). Each level has guidelines for laboratory facilities, safety equipment and laboratory practices and techniques.

BSL-1 containment is normally found in water-testing laboratories, in high schools, and in colleges teaching introductory microbiology classes. Work is done on an open bench or in a fume hood. Standard microbiological practices are used when working in the laboratory. Decontamination can be achieved by treating with chemical disinfectants or by steam autoclaving. Lab coats are required and gloves recommended. The laboratory work is supervised by an individual with general training in microbiology or a related science.

BSL-2 containment is designed to maximize safety when working with agents of moderate risk to humans and the environment. Access to the laboratory is restricted. Biological safety cabinets (Class 2, type A, BSC) must be available. An autoclave should be readily available for decontaminating waste materials. Lab coats, gloves and face protection are required. The laboratory work must be supervised by a competent scientist who understands the risk associated with working with the agents involved.

BSL-3 containment is required for infectious agents that may cause serious or potentially lethal diseases as a result of exposure by inhalation. The laboratory must be a separate building or isolated zone, with double-door entry, directional inward airflow. Many special procedures and protective devices are required when working with these agents. PROHIBITED

BSL-4 containment is required for dangerous/exotic agents that pose high risk of life-threatening disease. Numerous special facilities and precautions are required when working with these agents. PROHIBITED